Enterprise IT Architecture: Goals, Trends and Perspectives

There was some period without posting, it  means that better materials was aggregated. Together with our CTO Serhiy Kharytonov, we composed article on EA trends and perspectives with relation with our current projects and industry insights and it was just published on sandhill.com.

An IT department manager’s primary responsibility is to satisfy and respond to the needs of the business. For many IT managers, responding to evolving needs is the challenging part, with 90 percent or more of their department’s time spent reacting to current situations and merely 10 percent of staff time allocated to innovative activities that may lead to new business opportunities. For example, interest and growth in the use of mobile devices and mobile application platforms allows greater flexibility in a workforce that may result in greater productivity and profitability, but developing such solutions takes considerable IT resources. Unfortunately, many managers can’t dedicate staff to investigate, design and implement new technologies and applications to support mobile workers.

Read the full article called Enterprise IT Architecture: Goals, Trends and Perspectives on sandhill.com.

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Beyond Excel Era

Excel Era continues. For many organizations (or at least part of their processes) Excel Era will never end. Not because these organizations are ignoring  technological revolution but due to nature of processes. Excel is excellent tool for extremely flexible businesses functions. In finance, Excel will be often-used tool for long time. It is always faster to type dozen of formulas into Excel, then go through request-develop-build-test-deploy process. Automation is important and effective for processes which could be formalized, business rules management (BRM) is emerging to address agility in changes, but there always will be calculation documents somewhere. Read the rest of this entry »


Task flows in Intalio

In one of previous posts I depicted the main features of process-driven-task-based systems. I would like to back up thoughts by modern BPMS systems and discuss how do they support common sense.

Intalio is considered the best (or one of the best) open source BPMS. For instance, this comparison highlights slight outperforming of Intalio over jBPM. Intalio offers free version, which can be considered by small organizations or as an evaluation (due to restrictions of enterprise features like security, RDBMS support, scalability most organization will still need paid version of Intalio which starts from 9,500 USD/EUR). It may be not fair to compare Intalio to Oracle BPMS or IBM’s IBPM, which cost much more. Read the rest of this entry »


Is Excel Era over?

Citing an IBM study of customers (as stated here), 2.5% of the processes are complex, 22.5% are somewhat complex (less than 200 steps), 75% are not complex at all. This last category is done today by excel over email. Excel era is everywhere – people are creating and updating spreadsheets, sending them to managers by email for approval. Read the rest of this entry »


Common Sense Task Flows

In this small post I will depict typical behavior worker model.

Let ignore BPM, BPMS and other technology related stuff and focus on how people work. We have some typical tasks to do that fall into task pool (what to do). Worker get task (probably based on some priority decisions) and takes it. Taks may be already assigned to this person or person gets task from group pool (e.g. our team perform client loan history verifications, and tasks are assigned to us based on branches geographics, and for the rest we take clients from pool).

The key items that worker need in order to perform the job are:

1. Context. What data was gathered prior to this task? What additional information is useful for my decision making?

2. Instructions. How should I perform this task (isntructions may be already known for this type of activity)

3. Data. What data need to be gathered by me and passed by along with task completion (how do I report task results) Read the rest of this entry »